hirquitalliency


Young human being making her way through life.

I wear Fezes now. Fezes are cool.

"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint - it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly... time-y wimey... stuff." - The Doctor

Sophia. 20 something, German and Dutch heritage, but grew up in Australia for more than 18 years of my 20 something years of life. I'm an arts/economics student, majoring in awesome majors.

Music. Nonviolence. Love. Compassion. Photography. Volunteering. Social Justice.


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#Art

Art

createwords:

Drawing in times where I have felt sad, or lonely, or depressed was always my saviour. It was my way of ‘finalizing’ or coming to terms with things. I could always express my feelings with art, more so than with spoken words. When my grandfather passed away, drawing my favourite photo with him was therapeutic. It made me realise that whilst he was no more in physical form he was always with me - living inside of me in forms of memories, in forms of my habits and my blood.

When my god-mother died, I think that hit me the hardest. She died of leukemia, a fight that took several months. She had a period where she beat cancer into remission and I saw her in that period. And I’m glad that I did. Her smile that day I carved into my heart so that when I need it, it will always be there. I decided to draw her, but it is the hardest thing for me to do. My hand is literally shaking as I’m drawing her. It’s like … it’s like my body doesn’t to accept that she has gone, that she has passed away.

I am scared that I won’t do her justice, that in the end my drawing would … not portray her as I want her to be portrayed.  

artofjournalism:

Picture: Central Australian artist Nyurapayia Nampitjinpa, who is represented by dealer Chris Simon, on a property near Alice Springs yesterday. Picture: Steve Strike Source: Supplied

 
Five years ago, The Weekend Australian shone a light on the Aboriginal art world, exposing a nest of unscrupulous operators, exploiting and profiteering at the expense of artists.
The reports prompted a Senate inquiry from the Howard government. And in June 2007, to general applause, it recommended a code of conduct, greater scrutiny from authorities and increased support for indigenous art centres.
The recommendations came down one day before the Howard government’s intervention into Northern Territory Aboriginal communities. But these well-intentioned interventions into Aboriginal art have had a mixed effect. In fact, there is increasing evidence they are contributing to the deep malaise afflicting the entire indigenous art market

 
Read more here.

artofjournalism:

Picture: Central Australian artist Nyurapayia Nampitjinpa, who is represented by dealer Chris Simon, on a property near Alice Springs yesterday. Picture: Steve Strike Source: Supplied

Five years ago, The Weekend Australian shone a light on the Aboriginal art world, exposing a nest of unscrupulous operators, exploiting and profiteering at the expense of artists.

The reports prompted a Senate inquiry from the Howard government. And in June 2007, to general applause, it recommended a code of conduct, greater scrutiny from authorities and increased support for indigenous art centres.

The recommendations came down one day before the Howard government’s intervention into Northern Territory Aboriginal communities. But these well-intentioned interventions into Aboriginal art have had a mixed effect. In fact, there is increasing evidence they are contributing to the deep malaise afflicting the entire indigenous art market

Read more here.